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Dog & Puppy Vaccines

Dogs of all ages and life stages need to be kept up-to-date on their vaccination protocols in order to protect them from deadly diseases.  Puppies, elderly dogs, and dogs that are frequently out in public require vaccination for a lifetime of wellness.  Dr. Winkler reviews the medical history of each patient, and discusses with you your dog's lifestyle exposure risk to determine the vaccines that are right for your canine.

Preventative Health & Wellness Vaccines

These are the vaccines your dog should have regularly during their lifetime in order to prevent them becoming ill with any of the following very contagious or zoonotic diseases.

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Rabies

Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness & Laser Surgery Center Complies With New York State Department Of Health Law Regarding Mandatory Rabies Vaccination For All Cats, Dogs, and Domesticated Ferrets.

For the protection of the public, and our Veterinary Team, we will not administer services to your pet without proof of up-to-date Rabies Vaccination.  All patients of Suffolk Veterinary Group are required to carry certification of Rabies Vaccination to remain in good standing with our clinic.

Please see the link "What Pet Owners Need To Know About Rabies" for more information.


Canine “5-in-1” Vaccine

The most common vaccination for dogs, also known as the “Canine Distemper Vaccine,” “5-in-1,” or “DA2PPv” for short, is actually a combined vaccination against Canine Distemper, Adenovirus Type 1, Adenovirus Type 2, Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus.  Vaccination with “DA2PPv” starts in puppies at 6-8 weeks of age, and is given as boosters at 12 weeks, 16 weeks, and 20 weeks.  After the last booster of the “DA2PPv” puppy vaccine series, the vaccination has a protection period of approximately one year, and therefore adult dogs must receive a vaccination booster of “DA2PPv” once a year for life in order to maintain optimal protection against this disease.  Some, but not all, of the diseases prevented by the “DA2PPv” vaccine have the availability of Yearly Vaccine Titers to monitor a dog’s protection against these diseases, that way if their lifestyles are considered “low risk” of possible exposure and infection, Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Clinic can tailor a vaccine protocol particular to that patient.  The diseases “DA2PPv” protect against are described below.

Canine Distemper (DA2PPv)

Canine Distemper is a highly contagious viral disease that affects the respiratory and nervous systems, and is often fatal.  Those dogs that do survive infections with Canine Distemper undergo intensive hospitalization and medical therapy, and may develop uncontrollable shaking and twitches, or can experience seizure-like activity.  This disease can strike at dogs of any age, but is typically most fatal in dogs with compromised immune systems, the very young, and the very old.

All dogs should be vaccinated for Canine Distemper yearly if they frequent kennels, grooming parlors, pet shops, dog parks, or are in contact with neighborhood dogs through fences and across property lines.  All dogs which will be exposed to a new puppy in the household should also have vaccine boosters for Canine Distemper to protect them from the possibility of the new puppy carrying the disease.    

If your dog has a lifestyle in which the possibility of them contracting Canine Distemper is low, Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Center recommends that such dogs receive Yearly Vaccine Titers instead to make sure that their immune system is guarding them against Canine Distemper at appropriate levels, and then to booster vaccinate against the disease should those levels of protection fall below optimal.  Dogs with low lifestyle risk of exposure can also be placed on a 3-year vaccination schedule after consultation with the veterinarian to determine if this is right for your pet's lifestyle.

Canine Adenovirus Types 1 & 2 (DA2PPv)

These diseases often manifest themselves as a complication of another illness, Bordetella, commonly known as “kennel cough.”  Dogs infected with Canine Adenovirus Type 1 and/or Canine Adenovirus Type 2 can experience infectious liver disease and kidney disease, leading to damage of both organs. Some vaccines only protect against Adenovirus Type 1, and instead of an "A2" in their acronym, this disease may be represented with an "H" for "hepatic" disease.

All dogs should be vaccinated for Canine Adenoviruses Type 1 & Type 2 yearly if they frequent kennels, grooming parlors, pet shops, dog parks, or are in contact with neighborhood dogs through fences and across property lines.  All dogs which will be exposed to a new puppy in the household should also have vaccine boosters for Canine Adenoviruses Type 1 & Type 2 to protect them from the possibility of the new puppy carrying the disease.

There is currently no Yearly Vaccine Titer available for Canine Adenoviruses Type 1 & Type 2 to monitor a particular dog’s immune response.  If your dog has a lifestyle in which the possibility of them contracting Canine Adenoviruses Type 1 & Type 2 is low, then it is recommended that they receive booster vaccination against this disease at the same times they are booster vaccinated against Canine Distemper. Dogs with low lifestyle risk of exposure can also be placed on a 3-year vaccination schedule after consultation with the veterinarian to determine if this is right for your pet's lifestyle.

Canine Parainfluenza (DA2PPv)

Another complication of Bordetella, Canine Parainfluenza causes severe respiratory infection, and can be particularly debilitating to dogs with already compromised immune systems, the very young, and the very old.

All dogs should be vaccinated for Canine Parainfluenza yearly if they frequent kennels, grooming parlors, pet shops, dog parks, or are in contact with neighborhood dogs through fences and across property lines.  All dogs which will be exposed to a new puppy in the household should also have vaccine boosters for Canine Parainfluenza to protect them from the possibility of the new puppy carrying the disease.

There is currently no Yearly Vaccine Titer available for Canine Parainfluenza to monitor a particular dog’s immune response.  If your dog has a lifestyle in which the possibility of them contracting Canine Parainfluenza is low, then it is recommended that they receive booster vaccination against this disease at the same times they are booster vaccinated against Canine Distemper. Dogs with low lifestyle risk of exposure can also be placed on a 3-year vaccination schedule after consultation with the veterinarian to determine if this is right for your pet's lifestyle.

Canine Parvovirus (DA2PPv)

This is the number one most fatal disease in puppies and senior dogs, although it can strike dogs of any age at any time!  Commonly called “parvo,” this virus causes extremely debilitating diarrhea and vomiting.  Illness leads to a weakened immune response, severe dehydration, malnutrition, and ultimately organ failure.

Dogs that survive infection with “parvo” do so only with intensive hospitalization, intravenous fluid therapy and nutrition, and treatments with anti-viral medications.  Senior dogs (dogs over the age of 7 years) are particularly vulnerable to this disease if their vaccination against it has been allowed to lapse.

All dogs should be vaccinated for Canine Parvovirus yearly if they frequent kennels, grooming parlors, pet shops, dog parks, or are in contact with neighborhood dogs through fences and across property lines.  All dogs which will be exposed to a new puppy in the household should also have vaccine boosters for Canine Parvovirus to protect them from the possibility of the new puppy carrying the disease.

If your dog has a lifestyle in which the possibility of them contracting Canine Parvovirus is low, Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Center recommends that such dogs receive Yearly Vaccine Titers instead to make sure that their immune system is guarding them against Canine Parvovirus at appropriate levels, and then to booster vaccinate against the disease should those levels of protection fall below optimal. Dogs with low lifestyle risk of exposure can also be placed on a 3-year vaccination schedule after consultation with the veterinarian to determine if this is right for your pet's lifestyle.

Three Year DA2PPv For Adult Dogs

New American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) recommendations for the vaccination of adult dogs state that those with low lifestyle risk of exposure to the above diseases can be placed on a vaccine protocol of every 3-years for DA2PPv.  Puppies still need to complete the recommended series of 3 "puppy boosters" and should receive a DA2PPv booster 1-year after the last "puppy booster" before starting on a 3-year vaccination cycle.  These recommendations apply only to DA2PPv vaccination, and does not apply to Kennel Cough, Lyme Disease, Leptospirosis or Canine Influenza vaccination.  The AVMA still recommends those vaccines on a yearly basis.


Lifestyle Vaccines

Many other vaccinations are at the discretion of a dog's owner based upon consultation with our Veterinarians.  We understand your concerns regarding what many people feel is the over-vaccination of pets, and therefore encourage you to discuss with us your dog's particular lifestyle so together we can best evaluate your dog's risk of exposure, and prevent your pet from becoming seriously ill.  Yearly  Vaccine Titers may be more beneficial to your pet instead of automatic boostering.

Several other debilitating canine diseases also have vaccines available to protect your dog from severe illness and prolonged hospitalizations.  After a consultation with the Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Veterinary Team as to your dogs particular lifestyle, it is imperative that dogs which are high risk for exposure to these diseases get vaccinated against them.  Many public facilities, such as kennels and grooming parlors, will not welcome your dog’s patronage without certification that they have been recently vaccinated against some of the following diseases.

Canine Bordetella  AKA “kennel cough” –  The Most Common And Contagious Of Illness Of Dogs.  Spread by dog mucus (snot), "kennel cough" is easily one of the most frequent illnesses we see and treat in dogs at the Suffolk Veterinary Group Animal Wellness Center.  The most recognizable symptom is a chronic, loud, honking type cough sometimes described as appearing as if the dog is “throwing up.”  Indeed, some dogs will cough up wads of mucus from their lungs frequently mistaken for vomit.  When left untreated, irritation caused by "kennel cough," as well as a weakened immune system, leaves dogs open to complications from Adenovirus Type 2, Parainfluenza, and Canine Influenza.  Many kennels, grooming parlors, and dog training classes will not allow a dog’s patronage without a health certification signed by a Veterinarian stating that the dog was vaccinated to protect them from, and prevent the spread of "kennel cough."

Canine Influenza AKA “canine flu” --  Not to be confused with Canine Parainfluenza, the “canine flu” is a virus known as H3N8, and can only affect dogs. The symptoms a dog experiences from "canine flu" are similar to what we feel when we're sick with "human flu."  It is extremely contagious between dogs, and has been responsible for mass illness in dogs at dog shows, boarding kennels, shelters, and breeding facilities.  All it takes is one dog to be sick with “canine flu” to expose and endanger all the dogs in the facility.  Most recently and very close to home, a Pet Hotel in Farmingdale had an outbreak of Canine Influenza that sickened over 20 dogs.

Dogs which frequent dog shows, boarding or breeding kennels, and grooming parlors on a regular basis are at high risk for exposure to this disease.  All dogs adopted from local animal shelters, and dogs at home welcoming adopted dogs into their families, are also at high risk for exposure, and should be vaccinated against Canine Influenza.

Canine Leptospirosis AKA “Lepto” --  This Disease Is Contractible By People  “Lepto” is a family of bacterial infections that often causes fatal liver and kidney damage in advance stages.  Your dog contracts this disease by drinking from stagnate puddles of water, frequently swimming in natural bodies of water, or if your dog is frequently in contact with wild animals during field events.  The bacteria is spread through urine, therefore your dog may pick it up by licking an area a wild animal or an infected dog has urinated.  People who do not practice proper hygiene after coming into contact with their pet’s wastes, such as when cleaning up inappropriate urination in the house, are also at risk of contracting this disease from their pets.  It is particularly debilitating in senior and elderly pets, or pets with an already compromised immune system.

High risk dogs live a primarily outdoor lifestyle where water bowels and standing water are left outside for long periods of time.  Protecting your dog against the possibility of contracting “Lepto” also protects you.  Always wash your hands after cleaning up pet waste.

Canine Borreliosis  AKA “Lyme Disease” – Spread by ticks, “yme Disease is responsible for illness in many dogs that seem to suddenly experience limping, fevers, lethargy, depression, stiffness, and lack of appetite. Sometimes these symptoms are confused with “old age” in senior pets, but in reality are not a result of old age at all, but a result of Lyme Disease infection.  More often than not, Lyme Disease is a silent infection, showing no symptoms at all until the damage by the disease is already done.  In the early stages, Lyme Disease is easily managed and treatable, although some patients may experience re-exposure to the disease when lapse in giving a pet flea & tick prevention occures.  Yearly Immune Titers are available to determine if a dog needs a vaccine booster or antibiotic treatments to manage their illness.  Living on Long Island makes all dogs at high risk for infection with this disease.  You can reduce your dog’s risk with Lyme Disease vaccination, and by giving them a reputable flea & tick topical preventative medication all year round.

If you have any questions regarding your dog’s particular Health & Wellness Profile, and what your dog’s lifestyle means in regards to their particular risk for exposure to the above diseases, please call 631-696-2400 to schedule a consultation with one of our Veterinary Team members.  They’ll be able to review with you your dog’s past medical history and lifestyle with you to determine what vaccine protocol provides the best protection for them.

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Testimonial

I want to thank Dr. Winkler and his staff. They are the most compassionate animal care center ever. And when we recently had to put our kitty down, no where else will you receive the compassion they show. God bless them for their kindness and caring hearts.

Barbara B.
Selden, NY

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